Podcast: A Trip to the Scottish Islands – On-Site Checks & Calibration

The Scottish Islands are, undoubtedly, a beautiful part of the world. Amid awesome cliffs, green valleys, and wild beaches, the main means of transport are the ferries bringing people and cars from one island to another. To ensure safe ferry traffic, the landing stages are equipped with environmental monitoring instruments for water and weather measurements.

Dedicated support prolongs the system’s life span

Ferry captains rely on accurate information on water level, wind, and further weather parameters. They pull this data from OTT HydroMet sensors sited at the peer. Robin Guy is installing and maintaining these sensors. In this episode, he tells about his life as a service engineer and how his team contributes to safe ferry traffic and a longer life span of the used technology even in the harshest conditions.

Tune in and learn about: 

  • Environmental monitoring for Scottish ferry traffic
  • Possibilities and importance of on-site checks and calibration
  • The colorful life of a service engineer

Do you want to learn more about OTT HydroMet’s service and calibration capabilities? Our team is happy to help you.

Further reading

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