Discover the Fascinating World of Aerospace: ILA Trade Show in Berlin

The ILA has developed over time to become a leading event for the aerospace industry. This year, it will take place at the Berlin ExpoCenter Airport from 1st to 4th June 2016 once again providing an important meeting place for decision makers from politics, aviation business, science and research. We are represented at the shared booth of industry partners throughout Berlin and Brandenburg in Hall 3, no. 413a and show the importance of metrology regarding your travel safety

The ILA has developed over time to become a leading event for the aerospace industry. This year, it will take place at the Berlin ExpoCenter Airport from 1st to 4th June 2016 once again providing an important meeting place for decision makers from politics, aviation business, science and research. We are represented at the shared booth of industry partners throughout Berlin and Brandenburg in Hall 3, no. 413a and show the importance of metrology regarding your travel safety

The first German Aviation Show took place in Frankfurt in 1909 and lasted as much as 100 days. It was the forerunner of today’s ILA (International Aerospace Exhibition). Even back in 1909,  it was Germany’s largest and most important trade fair for the aerospace industry already. After repeated relocation to Hanover for example, in 1992 the ILA returned to Berlin Schoenefeld after 64 years with a new concept. Since then, the Berlin ExpoCenter Airport is the popular venue for those who have to do with commercial aviation, aerospace, military aircraft, helicopters and unmanned civilian but also military aircraft systems (UAVs).

They all have two things in common: highest safety requirements and optimized travel processes in order to master the ever increasing traffic volume (2014: 3.3 million passengers) in a smart manner.

In addition, the whims of nature add more challenges to passenger transport systems. How dangerous this can be, is shown by examples of engine failures due to volcanic ash or accidents on slippery, wet runways, as in Sao Paulo in July 2007.

Here preventive actions are necessary – for example, with the help of our “environment observers” in the form of sensors. Our precision measurement technology is relevant wherever environmental factors such as the weather can affect the traffic on the ground and in the air negatively. At airports our built-in runway sensors such as the IRS31Pro- and the ARS31Pro-UMB, spectroscopic ground sensors like NIRS31-UMB and the mobile road weather sensor MARWIS are a good choice. In the air,  weather sensors of the Lufft WS family as well as cloud height sensors such as the CHM 15k deliver important information about the flight weather. In order to observe the entire airspace it applies, that one measuring station is not sufficient. Therefore, we are working on building a complete cloud height measurement network steeling us for future volcanic eruptions and other air particles. If you combine the Lufft sensors with the right software such as ViewMondo, you keep your weather data in view conveniently.

Learn more about our useful helpers on our ILA joint booth of Berlin Partner für Wirtschaft und Technologie GmbH, in Hall 3, Stand 413 – we are looking forward to meeting you!

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